Coffee drinkers live longer, according to a National Cancer Institute study. The largest study ever conducted comparing coffee drinkers to those who do not drink coffee found that coffee drinkers had a lower risk of dying from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, and diabetes than those who did not drink coffee. Although drinking two to three cups of coffee a day lowered the risk of these diseases for both men and women, drinking six or more cups of coffee a day lowered the risk even further. For men, drinking moderate amounts of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee decreased their risk of dying by 10 percent; with a 14 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease, 17 percent lower risk of fatal respiratory disease, 16 percent lower risk of a fatal stroke, and 25 percent lower risk of dying from diabetes. Coffee-drinking women had a 13 percent overall decreased risk of dying, with a 15 percent lower risk from heart disease, 21 percent lower for respiratory disease, seven percent lower for stroke, and 23 percent lower for diabetes. Male coffee drinkers were slightly more likely to die of cancer, with no change in cancer mortality for female coffee drinkers.