A collaborative re-analysis of data from the InterAct case-control study conducted by Claudia Langenberg and colleagues has established that waist circumference is associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, independently of body mass index (BMI). Reporting recently in PLoS Medicine, the researchers estimated the association of BMI and waist circumference with type 2 diabetes from measurements of weight, height and waist circumference, finding that both BMI and waist circumference were independently associated with type 2 diabetes risk but waist circumference was a stronger risk factor in women than in men.

These findings indicate that targeted measurement of waist circumference in overweight individuals (who now account for a third of the U.S. and U.K. adult population) could be an effective strategy for the prevention of [type 2] diabetes because it would allow the identification of a high-risk subgroup of people who might benefit from individualized lifestyle advice.

The authors comment: "Our results clearly show the value that measurement of [waist circumference] may have in identifying which people among the large population of overweight individuals are at highest risk of [type 2] diabetes."


Source: Public Library of Science Press Release